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Thursday, October 19, 2017

Altered Starscape, Andromedan Dark: Book One by Ian Douglas

The  last book I read from Ian Douglas was Star Corpsman: Bloodstar back in 2012.  It was good, not great but good.  This book is the first in a new series and it is excellent.  It has obviously been impacted by other good Sci-Fi but how do you divorce you mind from your reading experiences. Earth has met aliens and is going to their capital.  Their arrival is fraught with peril and they find themselves far from where they had anticipated.

St.Clair is the military commander of the humans and Adler is the political leader.   Douglas illustrates a less than complimentary attitude regarding politicos and realistically with today’s political climate, how could he otherwise proceed.  The proliferation of AI adds a equal rights component to the book which is thought provoking.  As much as we would like to think that Asimov’s 3 laws of robotics actually might exist, Douglas thinks otherwise.

I found the author provide some interesting concepts to contemplate.   Gasp!, he actually encourages you to think! 

I really enjoyed the book and I recommend it.

Body of work of <a type="amzn"> Ian Douglas </a>

Web site: www.whkeith.com

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Saturday, September 30, 2017

The Bloodprint by Ausma Zehanat Khan


I’m prone to enjoying strong female protagonists.  Arian is a strong female protagonist facing implacable foes who feel women should be grossly subservient.  Arian is talented with a vocal power called the Claim.   The foes are doing their best to eliminate literacy and writing as that is how the power of the Claim is spread.   A copy of the Claim, the Bloodprint, is supposed to hold the key to defeating all the foes.   The gist of the book is the search for the Bloodprint.

Arian is a driven character who is nearly overwhelmed with guilt over the loss of her sister in a Talisman raid when they were children.  She has a love interest in the Silver Mage but denies herself love in her lust for her quest.  

The book was interesting but not captivating.  Some of the deprivations and behavior could have been pulled from headlines regarding religious zealots across the world.  That sadly provided some gritty reality to the story.

Treachery and duplicity seem to be the traits most valued by the bulk of the characters in the book.  The end sets up a second volume.

Web: http://www.ausmazehanatkhan.com/

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Monday, September 18, 2017

The Enchanter King by Dave Neuendorf

In book one, The Summoned King,  Jim Young is catapulted into a medieval style of world that is in need of a new king.   The idealism and enthusiasm of the teen age king from the first book is somewhat diminished.  Nevertheless the author holds to his vision by illustrating the impulsive and sometimes reckless side of a teenager. 

Jim faces his foes and demonstrates compassion and restraint, in spite of the occasional surges of anger and frustration.   This book introduces a dragon to the cast of characters.  There is mild violence and the author adds the addition of pregnancy and the ensuing responsibilities to leaven the plot.

I will mention again that Christianity is brought up as a factor in Jim's identity but there is no proselytization involved.


I recommend the book and look forward to the sequel.

Web Site: http://www.daveneuendorf.com/?author=1

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Strange Music by Alan Dean Foster

I really enjoy Alan Dean Foster and am shocked to realize I have not read one of his books since 2011.

This book does not have the same tongue in cheek aspect that was prevalent in the last Pip and Flinx book.   Flinx has become practically sedentary and was bored.   An old friend asked him to look into an illegal broach of a planet that is not yet a member of the Commonwealth.  The broach seems to be by a single profiteer using proscribed technology with the natives.  Flinx is asked to clandestinely look into the problem.

The natives are seal like and communicate via singspeech.   The singspeech becomes a bit tedious and is the most annoying factor of the book. 

Flinx is forced to use his brain rather than his empathic talents to succeed in his goal.  

I recommend the book.  

Body of work of <a type="amzn"> Alan Dean Foster </a>


This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Saturday, September 9, 2017

Chasing Embers by James Bennett

Red Ben is a remnant of lost magic.   He finds his life threatened by the breaking of the Pact, an agreement to have magical creatures sleep until the Fae return with one member of each group staying awake.   When the Pact is broken, Ben finds his life and his love threatened.

The author did a nice job depicting Ben’s frustration of a long life with a desire to love and be loved and being thwarted by his own longevity.  The characters were interesting and the plot was sufficiently complicated to keep your interest.  

You will find witches, grudge holding wild men, ancient Egyptians, dragons and other highly colorful characters. 

It seems to be the initial book of a series.

I look forward to reading more.

Web: I could not find a web site for Bennett

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Monday, September 4, 2017

Call of Fire by Beth Cato


Repeating my self from my previous review. An alternative world setting in 1906 provides the scene.   Women are treated in a despicable fashion that sadly was pretty much true in that time period's reality.  One of the things I liked about this book was that Cato based her story on actual events and actual mores.   That certainly doesn't detract for the fantastical elements imbued in both the setting and the characters.

Cato did her homework.   The basis of her discrimination was sadly accurate.  History frequently ignores events that are either embarrassing or politically sensitive. Genocide has plagued reality on all together too many historical occasions. 

If you haven't noticed by particular bias in past reviews, I will draw note to the fact that I enjoy fictional butt kicking females as well as surrounding myself in day to day life by accomplished strong women.  I have a section on my blog in an homage to strong women. 

Ingrid  and Cy have recognized their mutual attraction and there is more sexual tension in this book than previous books.   Blum, the vile villainess is hunting Ingrid while Ingrid hunts her friends, two polarized hunts though, one good and one evil.  Fenris continues to fuss over Bug, their airship.  Teddy Roosevelt has a larger role in this book and his goals are not quite the same as Ingrid’s.   Ingrid discovers new things about her power and suffers from it’s use.

War, violence and prejudice are all addressed in this volume even more so than the previous book.

Fenris, Jennings and Lee accompany and support her adventures, all of whom have deep dark secrets of their own.  

Cato has crafted a world that I like even better than the Clockwork world.  My reviews of several her books are below.  

I highly recommend.  

Site:  http://www.bethcato.com/




This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Playing to the Gods by Melanie Rawn

This is the conclusion to the Glass Thorn series.  I really enjoyed Touchstone, the first book.   The second, Elsewhens  and the third, Thornlost  did not grab me as strongly but the conclusion in this book was excellent.   The theatre group, Touchstone, finally addresses all the issues of the first three books.  It ties everything up and provides a suitable ending for the myriad characters

Ms. Rawn has done a masterful job in presenting an eclectic cast of characters.  The characters often seem to be wallowing in personal revulsion.  Introspection is carried to extremes often leading to depression.  Ms. Rawn shows that people can deal with their personal ghosts and addictions and over come them.    Practically all  the allusions to societal ills such as discrimination, poverty, perversion that were made without being done with a heavy hand are addressed.

I found this book far more captivating than the previous four but sometimes things need to be seen to the end to appreciate the whole.

I recommend the book.


Web Site: http://www.melanierawn.com/

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

The Punisher-Black and White by Edmondson and Gerads


I haven’t reviewed a graphic novel in quite awhile.  I enjoyed this one.  The Punisher is an old testament vigilante.  Often reading and watching the news, one can understand the motivation of a vigilante.  This is the first volume in a new series.

Story line and graphics combine to provide a different experience than a straight novel.  The art work was very good, dark but that is the nature of the Punisher.  The text and art meld nicely to provide a dark, nihilistic view of the world.  Futility and anger fuel the work of the Punisher. 

There are many references to previous stories and characters and not having read and Punisher comics (prehistoric graphic novels) in a long time, I was left scratching my head on occasion.

Overall impression was positive.  Graphic novels appear to have greater depth than the comics I grew up with. 

I liked it.

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Uncle Brucker the Rat Killer by Leslie Peter Wulff

This is a strange book.  I’ve read a lot of books and I’ve read a lot of strange books but this ranks up their with the strangest.  Walt, a teenager from a dysfunctional home, spends a lot of time with a very strange Uncle Brucker who is the Rat Killer.  Not a rat killer but the premier rat killer.
 
The author has Uncle Brucker provide a lot of information on rat types, rat language and rat behavior.  A war between rats and humans involves both Walt and his Uncle.

This was way to nonsensical for me.  I like fantasy but this was like a bad fairy tale. 

I really didn’t care for the book.

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Conflict by Walt Socha


Alternate reality or time traveling, neither the protagonists or I are sure what happen.   A group of young adults end up leaving a dude ranch and ending up nearly 1000 years in the past.   The group discovers that the past much as the future is fraught with danger and potential.  

Joe has a good heart and is suffering from nightmares when he suddenly finds himself as a leader of a band of mismatched adventurers.   Thrust into Pennsylvania Indian history, the group finds themselves unknowingly tasked to change the future.

The struggle Joe has with age and adulthood smacked of realism.   The incursion of Mississippi river culture into Pennsylvania is theoretically accurate.  Socha did a nice job setting up a culture and how it handled different types of invasion.

This appears to be the first in a series, I look forward to reading more.

Web: http://www.waltsocha.com/

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Sunday, August 6, 2017

The Rift Uprising by Amy S. Foster


This book features a butt kicking female protagonist.   Ryn is seventeen and a Citadel team leader.  Citadels are enhanced humans who protect society from a trans-dimensional invasion.

Rifts are breaks in reality allowing entry into this earth.  The multi-dimension theory is that there are infinite earths that may have developed in different ways from the current earth.  Citadels are enhanced teenagers who are tasked to guard the Rifts and prevent any cross over beings from running lose in our earth.

Ryn discovers that ARC, the controlling entity of Rift guardianship, may not be truly forthcoming with what is actually happening.   The enhancement process appears to have some seriously negative side effects.

Ryn, her team and a Rift traveler are faced with the daunting task of discovering the truth about the Rifts and the Citadels.

I enjoyed the book.

Web: http://amysfoster.com/the_rift_trilogy 

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Mongrel Mage by L.E. Modesitt, jr



I am aware it is not a steampunk novel but
I love this rating graphic. 
Once again Modesitt provides an entertaining story with philosophic undertones that provoke thoughtful ponderings.   It may be a stretch to compare the plot to the very current brouhaha over Transgenders but in Modesitt’s world  if you are a mage, identification as to white or black can be a life or death decision.  Similar unthinking prejudice provides thoughts about the plot.

Beltur, a weak white mage, discovers things about himself that dramatically change his life.   The plot centers on his journey of self discovery and it is leavened with a tyrant’s attack on his new home.

Another thought that struck me was the title and use of mongrel is indicative of the strength of our nation.  The good old USA is made up of a wealth of ethnicities that meld together to a dynamic and vibrant population.   It is imperative that we do not let our politicians polarize us into reds and blues, we are all red white and blue.  This is the problem with Modesitt’s books, they make me think. (gasp!)

Modesitt suggests that a truly ordered mind would have difficulty dissembling.   Beltur discovers that hatred can be unthinking and have no basis besides erroneous perceptions.  In spite of the consistent pattern of Modesitt’s protagonists, I enjoy how each discovers their strengths and weaknesses and grows into a laudable character. 

I am a FAN!

I highly recommend.  



This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Twelve Days by Steven Barnes

Barnes work is very thought provoking.  This story focuses on the untapped potential of the human brain.  It is touted as a paranormal thriller but frankly I believe there are many factors of the human brain that we have yet to identify, quantify or explore.  Consequently I would label this as a thriller and skip the paranormal.  What is normal anyway?

A charismatic cult leader has plans to change the world.  A small boy who is on the autistic spectrum may be the key to her success.  Standing in the way of her exploiting the child is a former military man with a martial arts background and a mother who adores her special needs child.

There is lots of action and questionable decisions in this book.  It was an enjoyable read.
I recommend it.

Web:https://stevenbarneslife.wordpress.com/

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Friday, June 30, 2017

The Bones of the Earth by Rachel Dunne


This novel is based on the mythology of parent gods disavowing their twin children the same as the last Dunne novel (In the Shadow of the Gods) as both are Bound Gods novels. 

There is a dichotomy in some of the characterizations.  The book has multiple main characters, each of whom has their own story.   The methodology of some character lines is so different from others that it is almost like multiple authors.   That isn't a problem but the diverse character lines led to some confusion.

Many of the same characters are in this book,  Scal and  Rora were still the characters that successfully grabbed my interest.  Joros continues to be the most despicable of the characters.  

The book has an interesting premise but I had some difficulty in maintaining my interest.

web site: http://racheldunne.com/

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Firebrand by A. J. Hartley


This is the second book set in a future where whites, blacks and browns live in uneasy harmony.  Anglet Sutonga is a teenage steeplejack.  One of if not the premier steeplejack in Bar-Selhem turned private eye or perhaps special agent.  Someone has stolen some documents and her personal government official tasks her with finding them.

Hartley did an excellent job creating a community that seems to combine aspects of Victorian society with a respect for the press and uneasy race relations.  Anglet’ ethics and morality give her frequent pause in this book.  She is faced with a sociopath with semblances of a racist and a Hitler clone who frighten her and nauseate her simultaneously.   

Current events play a part as there are refugees driven from their homes by war and civilians interfering in government plots as well as nefarious government plots.

I highly recommend this second book and love the strong female protagonist.  I pleased to find that Hartley, a noted male author,  has gone out of his way to feature a strong female protagonist in this new series.

Web:  http://ajhartley.net/

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

The Reluctant Queen : Book Two of The Queens of Renthia by Sarah Beth Durst

 


Kudos!  Again! It is so satisfying to find a new author(to me) who writes so well.   This, too, was a satisfying story set in a forest community surrounded by implacable enemies and defended by questionable heroes.  Queen Daleina finds herself thrust into a position she doesn’t feel she deserves and struggles to make peace with the recent violence that put her there.  A desperate need to find an heir fuels the plot.

Bayn, the wolf, and Ven the champion are, again, major components of the story.  Naelin, a new character, brings a maturity level and a different approach to a society and government focused on pomp and circumstance.

This, the second volume, was an excellent book that held my interest, forced me to read later in the evening than I wanted to and satisfactorily wrapped up the plot but clearly left the door open to a sequel.

I highly recommend.

Web Site: http://www.sarahbethdurst.com/



This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

The Darkest Corner by Liliana Hart




This is a romantic adventure with the emphasis on romantic.  When I read that it was about the Gravediggers, an elite team of special ops agents, I expected more adventure.  Tess, a small town girl, has a mother who steals from her, an ex-finance and works as a mortician for  Eve, a mysterious ice female dog.(using a euphemism here)

Said dog has purchased the funeral home where Tess was working and has turned it into a clandestine special ops center.   Eve is the liaison between hard men and a harder board of directors who have taken on themselves the responsibility for policing the world.

The book features a love relationship with Tess and one of the Gravediggers and has the team thwarting a terrorist plot.

Romance is not my cup of tea but this was pretty good.  Considering the author has sold way more of her books than I have sold of mine, perhaps I should try and tap my romantic side. Hmm, not likely.

https://lilianahart.com/

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase by Greg Cox



The Librarians is a TNT TV series.  This book is based on that TV series.  The book isn't labeled as YA but I would classify it as a young adult read.  It is pretty simplistic in it's characterizations and superficial in a lot of ways.   The gist of the plot is that the Librarians are tasked with safeguarding mystical and magical books and relic.   The particular relic in this book is the original Mother Goose stories.   The Librarians and the descendants of the original Mother Goose are competing in the quest to find the powerful relic which has been divided into three volumes.  

The plot is ok in the book and it does have plenty of action.  You need to suspend all disbelief to get into the story.   It has it's moments but it does read like a TV script. 

It chronicles the adventures of the Librarians. These are not your stereotypical schoolmarm type librarians. This group of adventures are charged with gathering magical and mythical books, artifacts and treasures that may be too dangerous to be in the public domain.

This specific adventure focuses on Mother Goose tales and the dangers inherent in rhyming. There is very mild violence and lots of references to magical and mythical things.

The story line and plot are clearly meant for the younger reader.

It seems suitable for 4th or 5th graders.

web: http://www.gregcox-author.com/



This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Urban Enemies edited by Joseph Nassise




This is a book of short stories which I tend to avoid but with the inclusion of Jim Butcher and Jonathan Mayberry I had to give it a shot.  It is a compilation of back stories of villains that are featured prominently in the author’s full length books. It provides a different perspective than the hero-centric novels.

The authors included in the book are:
Kelley Armstrong
Jim Butcher
Domino Finn
Diana Pharoah Francis
Caitlin Kitteredge
Jonathan Mayberry
Seanan McGuire
Jon F. Merz
Joseph Nassise
Lilith Saintcrow
Craig Schaefer
Jeff Somers
Steven Savile
Carrie Vaughn
Sam Witt
This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Steeplejack by A. J. Hartley

This book is set in a future where whites, blacks and browns live in uneasy harmony.  One pictures South Africa but this is merely my personal supposition.   Anglet Sutonga is a teenage steeplejack.  One of if not the premier steeplejack in Bar-Selhem.  The occupation is so hazardous that being an older teen makes Anglet a rarity as she has survived the hazards of her occupation.  Steeplejacks repair and build the tops of towers and chimneys.  In Anglet’s case she stumbles into a conspiracy that is killing her apprentices, peers and community.

Hartley did an excellent job creating a community that seems to combine aspects of Victorian society with a respect for the press and uneasy race relations.  Anglet was driven by ethics and morality.   She is an excellent protagonist.  

This is the first in a series. I will be reviewing Firebrand, her next book, soon.

I highly recommend it and love the strong female protagonist.  I pleased to find that Hartley, a noted male author,  has gone out of his way to feature a strong female protagonist in this new series.


Web:  http://ajhartley.net/


This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Friday, June 2, 2017

Ode to Donuts


On this National Donuts Day I wish to pay tribute to one of my favorite things.

Ode to Donuts   

Never did I see

A more perfect food for me!

So round, so firm so fully packed,

I must admit my brain is racked,

To come up with a better snack.

So well rounded as a treat,

The zero calorie center that can’t be beat.

Life’s paths are leaved so well,

With May’s donuts that were simply swell,

With First Street Bakery’s kind souls

Who filled our bags with glazes so gold,

With Ronnie’s Hilton Head knarly treat,

With Hornburger’s cream filled oh so sweet,

With Publix’s maple glaze dream,

Only beat by YumYum’s cruller of sour cream.

My life defined by donut’s sweet road.

Three exercise bikes worn to a nub,

In an effort to keep donut’s sweet love,

from making me a happy but lardy tub.

On this day celebrate the wonder

Of this wonderful, awesome treat

This ode’s to you oh donut delight,

Your ability to turn darkness to light,

To defeat depression and stifle blight,

There is no mental state so dire

That a donut can’t un-mire.

There is no treat so sweet

That the wonderful donut cannot beat.


 

recommendations.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

The Kill Society: A Sandman Slim Novel by Richard Kadrey


The last time I reviewed a Sandman Slim novel I got all kinds of negative comments for not rating it the best book that has ever been written.   Kadrey has some very vocal and I have to assume very young rabid fans from the more virulent comments.   However, I call them as I sees them.   Jim Stark is now below Hell and expected to help the Magistrate fulfill his holy quest.

The book is rife with the requisite violence and profaneness in both the verbal and spiritual sense.   Nothing, I repeat nothing is sacred.  If you are easily offended this not the book for you.  It does seem to appeal to the fans of Grindhouse types of entertainment. 

Jim/Lucifer/the monster who kills monsters has a code of honor and while it would be a stretch to say a heart of gold, he does have some redeeming moral values. 

This is a strange mix of hoodoo magic, hellion stuff, wise cracking angels and guns and ammo.   The good guys are not so good and the bad guys are worse.  

I enjoyed the book but then I have eclectic tastes.

Links to other Kadrey book reviews:  The Wrong Dead Guy; The Perdition ScoreThe Everything Box

web site: http://richardkadrey.com/slim-series/

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Spotlight on Edward Ashton's The End of Ordinary

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Drew Bergen is an Engineer. He builds living things, one gene at a time. He's also kind of a doofus. Six years after the Stupid War -- a bloody, inconclusive clash between the Engineered and the UnAltered -- that's a dangerous combination.
Hannah is Drew's greatest project, modified in utero to be just a bit better at running than most humans. She’s also his daughter. Her plan for high school is simple: lay low and run fast. Unfortunately for Hannah, her cross-country team has other plans.

Jordan is just an ordinary Homo-Sap. But don’t let that fool you -- he’s also one of the richest kids at Briarwood, and even though there isn’t a single part of him that’s been engineered, someone has it out for him.

Drew thinks he’s working to develop a spiffy new strain of corn, but Hannah and her classmates disagree. They think he's cooking up the end of the world. When one of Drew's team members disappears, he begins to suspect that they might be right. Soon they're all in far over their heads, with corporate goons and government operatives hunting them, and millions of lives in the balance.

Energetic and bitingly satirical, THE END OF ORDINARY is a riveting near-future thriller that asks an important question: if we can't get along when our differences are barely skin deep, what happens when they run all the way down to the bone?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Edward Ashton lives with his adorably mopey dog, his inordinately patient wife, and a steadily diminishing number of daughters in Rochester, New York, where he studies new cancer therapies by day, and writes about the awful things his research may lead to by night. He is the author of Three Days in April, as well as several dozen short stories which have appeared in venues ranging from the newsletter of an Italian sausage company to Louisiana Literature and Escape Pod. You can find him online at edwardashton.com.

THE END OF ORDINARY Harper Voyager Impulse
June 20, 2017 ISBN: 9780062690319
$3.99 eBook

Link to my review of  Ashton's  Three Days in April which I thoroughly enjoyed. 

This book may have been received free of charge from a publisher or a publicist. That will NEVER have a bearing on my recommendations.

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Spotlight on Owl and the Electric Samurai by Kristi Charish

OWL AND THE ELECTRIC SAMURAI
The Owl Series by Kristi Charish, Volume 3
Pocket Star EBook
May 8, 2017
ISBN 9781501139727
$5.99

OWL AND THE ELECTRIC SAMURAI is the third exciting novel starring the unforgettable antiquities thief Owl—a modern-day “Indiana Jane” who reluctantly navigates the hidden supernatural world. From the pen of rising urban fantasy star Kristi Charish (Owl and the Japanese Circus), for fantasy lovers everywhere…

The International Archaeology Association (IAA) is responsible for keeping all things supernatural under wraps. They’re also responsible for ruining the promising archaeology career of Alix Hiboux, better known as Owl. Needless to say, Owl’s still a little sore about that.

Just to keep Owl’s life lively, the IAA has opened a bounty on the two designers of World Quest, the online RPG that is much, much more than it seems. Owl needs to locate the notorious gaming duo before the other mercenaries do. But finding the gamers won’t be easy since every clue points to them hiding out in the legendary lost city of Shangri-La. Not to mention that the last time Owl and the game designers spoke, their conversation didn’t exactly end on the best note…

Meanwhile, undercurrents of supernatural politics are running amok in Tokyo, dragging Owl and her friends into a deadly game of wits with an opponent who calls himself the Electric Samurai. The cost of losing? All-out civil war between two powerful supernatural factions. All in all, just another great day on the job.

About the author:
Kristi Charish is a scientist and science fiction/fantasy writer who resides in Vancouver, Canada with her spousal unit, Steve, and two cats named Captain Flash and Alaska. She received her BSc and MSc from Simon Fraser University in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, and her PhD in Zoology from the University of British Columbia. Kristi writes what she loves; adventure heavy stories featuring strong, savvy female protagonists.